LIBROS Y LIBERTAD

March 16, 2017 11:21 AM
LIBROS Y LIBERTAD

Laney student leader Andrea Calfuquier talks literature and liberation One classmate describes her as “a force of nature.” This is her third semester, and Andrea Calfuquir has already emerged as one of Laney’s prominent student leaders. Dr. Kimberly King, Professor of Psychology, is one of Calfuquir’s mentors at the Teach-in planning group. King said that as a new student at Laney she was “already involved in trying to make it a better place for students. She understands the importance of focusing on people at the bottom of society, with a passion to fight for the future and find hope for […]

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The kind of school that keeps its students safe?

March 2, 2017 9:32 AM
The kind of school that keeps its students safe?

“This is the beginning of a greater student unity,” Laney student Andrea Calfuquir said of the student meeting held on Thursday, Feb. 16. She referred to the growing number of students who came to the meeting of the Laney Community Engagement Leadership (CEL) Cohort. CEL cohort interns meet weekly with their faculty mentors, Alicia Caballero-Christenson and Paul Bulick, to create a more united and active student body and to appeal for increased student participation and community action. The focus of last Thursday’s meeting was to build a student coalition movement to support undocumented and Muslim students by establishing Peralta colleges […]

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Electors must dump Trump

December 8, 2016 10:07 AM

The media keep referring to Donald Trump as “President-elect”— but why? The popular vote has Hillary Clinton ahead by more than 2.6 million votes. The Electoral College vote is almost two weeks away. It is the electors who vote for president. Alexander Hamilton did not trust the public with the responsibility of electing a President; he made constitutional provisions for an electoral college to vote for president. In Hamilton’s day, Southern states had stable economies based on slavery; Northern states with densely populated cities were in debt. Southern states demanded more say. This is wildly outdated. Some so-called patriots wax […]

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Standoff at Standing Rock

November 10, 2016 11:20 AM

There’s a stand off at Standing Rock, North Dakota.The Dakota Access Pipeline threatens the Missouri River, the Standing Rock Sioux’s reservation’s water source. The tribe alleges that the Army Corps of Engineers, Sunco, and its parent company Energy Transfer Partners ignored due process for studies and permits. Yet Sunoco continues to plow ahead. Native Americans from over 200 tribes live together in a camp of tipis, tents and geodesic domes. Their numbers double in size each weekend. At the entrance of the camp, a billboard reminds people: “We are protectors. We are nonviolent. We do not carry weapons. We keep […]

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Vote 2016

October 27, 2016 8:08 AM
Vote 2016

From parole to pot, from plastic bags to prescription drugs, the bay prepares to cast their ballots in a historic election. The Laney Tower’s guide to measures and propositions. In the Laney Tower’s final issue before the Nov. 8 election, the Tower staff offers its readers a comprehensive election guide that looks at many measures and propositions on the ballot next month. From prescription drugs to parole, from pot to plastic bags, many of the issues that these measures and propositions tackle will have long-lasting effects on students, teachers, staff members, and the community at large. At the Tower, we […]

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Keeping the beat going

October 13, 2016 11:12 AM
Keeping the beat going

Oaktown Jazz Workshop’s Ravi Abcarian inspires a new generation of musicians Oaktown Jazz Workshop’s founder, Khalil Shaheed, was only 13 years old when he painted a moustache on his face and slinked into Chicago’s jazz clubs to see America’s greatest jazz musicians. It was the 1950’s in Chicago, and the iconic Blue Note jazz club was hosting musicians like Louis Armstrong and “King” Oliver. Soon Shaheed would interrupt his classical music education to tour with the Woody Shaw and the Buddy Miles bands. After he tired of touring and was ready to settle down, Oakland—which had a thriving African American […]

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ART AND COUNTRY

September 29, 2016 9:08 AM
ART AND COUNTRY

KOREA DAY AT THE SAN FRANCISCO ASIAN ART MUSEUM A large and enthusiastic crowd at San Francisco’s Asian Art Museum joined in celebration for the Eighth Annual Korea Day on Sept. 25. The Asian Art Museum is the first Western museum to have a department dedicated exclusively to Korean art. After eight years of putting on Korea Day, the museum continues to draw more and more people to the celebration. There were many families of different ethnicities at the museum. There were Korean Americans and Korean nationals in attendance, but also a diverse group of people interested in Korean art […]

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Dreamweavers: Local museums stitch together big names and high art

September 15, 2016 12:42 PM
Dreamweavers: Local museums stitch together big names and high art

Across the street from the UC campus stands the audacious new home for the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA). It has transformed Center Street from a corridor between two campuses into a cultural center of Berkeley, with its galleries, hip cafes and restaurants. It unites the scholarly world with the community, with its study rooms and interactive rooms, rooms for the public to learn about and create art. BAMPFA is unique in the world as being devoted equally to both art and film. BAM’s acquisitions include over 19,000 art works. The PFA, with a collection of over […]

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This house is not a home

June 30, 2016 12:03 AM
This house is not a home

Even after resettlement, abused refugee women still find themselves on the verge of homelessness

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From trash, treasure

May 19, 2016 12:53 PM
From trash, treasure

Laney Library’s EcoArt exhibit encourages Earth-friendly art-making “Thank goodness for Generation Z,” says ceramic artist Mary Rose Czajka. “They will save us.” Czajka’s installation, “Tidal Lagoons,” can be seen at the Laney College Library, where students’ final projects for the Laney College EcoArt Matters classes are now on display. When you come into the library, prepare to learn more about relevant issues and saving the world. You will be struck by the art materials: they are the detritus we leave behind. FROM TRASH, TREASURE Instructors and artists Sharon Siskin Andre and Andre Singer Thompson, are both zealous environmentalists and political […]

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Jazz studio swells with sounds of students, faculty

12:22 PM

The two Laney College Jazz combos and the Jazz Orchestra held their last concert of the semester on Monday night to a capacity crowd. In G189, Charlie Gurke took his musicians, students and audience on a journey that spans 70 years of American jazz history, from old blues standards to contemporary composers. The concert ranged from Count Basie’s theme song and big band swing standard of the 30’s, “One O’Clock Jump,” and pop standards like “It’s Only a Paper Moon” to contemporary Kenny Baron’s “Gichi.” Each group put on an excellent show. The band leader, Gurke, was beaming by the […]

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Freedom of information

May 5, 2016 3:55 PM
Freedom of information

Investigative journalist shares tips for truth-seekers in a redacted world Investigative journalist Michael Montgomery visited the Laney college Mass Media and Society class on April 28. His lecture was preceded two days earlier by a screening of Montgomery’s portrayal of the “Pot Reporter” in a humorous animated short about medical marijuana. Michael Montgomery has been a reporter for years. He started as a kid with a passion for journalism, worked the high-school yearbook, and step-by-step honed his chops to become a reporter. He now works with the Center for Investigative Reporting, a solid and well-respected news organization, right up there […]

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GendHer inequality

2:16 PM

Whether we participate in individual sports, team sports or take Kineseology classes, Laney’s women face surprise locker room closures. Women who take classes or participate in team sports don’t have to worry much about getting locked out. Instructors have keys to let them in and lock up when everyone’s finished. After I learned about those keys it was still difficult. I am an older disabled student. It takes time for me to get myself together, so I always felt pressure to get the lead out to accommodate the instructor’s schedule. After a lovely nighttime swim in a warm pool, steam […]

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Paradise Lost?

April 21, 2016 11:19 AM
Paradise Lost?

In new book, Laney professor details ecological damage done to Polynesian isles In ‘Isles of Amnesia’ Laney Geography Professor Mark Rauzon recounts his island-by-island efforts to reclaim biodiversity. Researcher, photographer, writer, ornithologist, artist and ‘contract killer,’ Rauzon kept journals describing his work over a span of 30 years. He transcribed them into this beautiful and compelling volume, the second in his trilogy of ‘Isles.’ ‘Isles of Amnesia’ begins with a reference to the famous first three words (‘Call me Ishmael’) of literature’s zenith nautical epic, ‘Moby Dick.’ But instead of hunting down a great whale, Rauzon was combing islands for […]

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‘Más’ depicts fiery fight

March 17, 2016 1:45 PM
‘Más’ depicts fiery fight

Laney Theatre heats up with a tale of smoke and mirrors “Más”, by Mita Ortiz, is a true story about the struggle of high school students in Tucson, Ariz., who tried to install Mexican American Studies (MAS) program into the high school curriculum. The script is derived from interviews, media coverage, and court documents. The narrative begins with MAS’s inception and progresses into its practice, the disharmony within that sparked public controversy, and finally the dismantling of the program by a conservative Arizona legislature in 2010. The play opens in a sweat lodge; four brightly colored dancers take center stage, […]

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